Values-Based Architecture as a Regenerative Approach to The Human-Environment Relationship

Values-Based Architecture as a Regenerative Approach to The Human-Environment Relationship

A.E. Williams P.O. Williams 

Soft Loud House Architects, Australia

Page: 
63-74
|
DOI: 
https://doi.org/10.2495/DNE-V14-N1-63-74
Received: 
N/A
|
Accepted: 
N/A
|
Published: 
16 January 2019
| Citation

ACCESS

Abstract: 

Soft Loud House Architects have been developing a methodology for values-based architecture for nearly two decades. This regenerative design approach develops the vision of a sustainable place for the client to dwell within, coherent with their goals, needs and values, engaging them in the design process to realise that vision. Central considerations to this process are the client’s identity, what they find meaningful, and their relationship to place; all of which inform emotional and spiritual wellbeing. Values-based architecture contrasts with the published and awarded realm of architecture in Australia, which prioritises aesthetics and technology over environmental sustainability. This paper explores the relationship between values and the spaces we create, discussing two completed projects; the Cockatoo House and the Underground House, to illustrate how values-based architecture can enrich the client’s quality of life by aligning their values with their actions, so that the designed environment becomes a coherent part of their identity.

Keywords: 

disconnection, modernity, regenerative architecture, sustainability, sustainable design, values, values-based architecture

1. Introduction
1. Values
2. Regenerative Architecture
3. Values-based Architecture
4. Cockatoo House
5. Underground House
6. Conclusion
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